Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

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define999
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by define999 » Thu Feb 19, 2009 11:37 am

I think that's the reason so many of us have high hopes of breeding them in captivity, so they don't have to be yanked out of their natural habitats.
exactly, every time I look at my Gaby, I feel a little guilty for possibly contributing to thier demise in the wild.... Fish like other things can be a unsustainable resource, unless captive breeding is succesfull. When I found this article, I knew you guys would be excited! :shock: I did find this interesting....
One basic study involves adding a reporter gene — such as the gene that produces green fluorescent protein — to a specific gene sequence in a developing puffer
I have noticed an almost florecent spot on the upper head of my puffer.... shes had this almost bright glowing green spot for a long time... it didnt look like ich or another other kind of disease... I know this is another topic and I will post pics soon in another thread.....
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by zombiefetus » Thu Feb 19, 2009 11:49 am

I'm really torn on this. On one hand, it's amazingly cool that they're doing this and I'm so excited to hear about the process.
But it's also going to be adding so many Green Spotted Puffers to the pet industry that really aren't needed, hopefully it will dramatically cut down on those being taken from the wild. I guess it depends on how many they plan on breeding. I don't know.
define999 wrote:
One basic study involves adding a reporter gene — such as the gene that produces green fluorescent protein — to a specific gene sequence in a developing puffer
I have noticed an almost florecent spot on the upper head of my puffer.... shes had this almost bright glowing green spot for a long time... it didnt look like ich or another other kind of disease... I know this is another topic and I will post pics soon in another thread.....
The green spot on the head is pretty common. I'm not sure if all GSPs have it, but I've seen a lot with it.
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Myaj » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:03 pm

LOL yes the green patch on the head is pretty much normal on a happy, healthy GSP.
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by define999 » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:06 pm

The green spot on the head is pretty common. I'm not sure if all GSPs have it, but I've seen a lot with it.
cool... I just did a search on the forum for "bright green patch" and came up with a few hits... I guess it can be a sign of contentment? Anyway, im not as worried as I was.... okay im done hijacking my own thread!! :lol: So back to the subject, yea I understand your concern zombiefetus.... the market could be flooded with many, many cheap GSP's. Which will in turn mean many, many dead GSP's! But whats worse? The eventual scarceity in the wild? Id much rather see comercialy bred GSP's flood the market, and the price dropped so as to make it financialy less viable for the profit driven fish collectors of Asia that could care less about the fish they are collecting. If this means that the percentage of tank breed GSP sales far outweigh the sale of wild caught ones, I am for this. And hopefully the wild populations will get a needed breather........
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by define999 » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:07 pm

Myaj wrote:LOL yes the green patch on the head is pretty much normal on a happy, healthy GSP.
Thanks Myaj! Im much less worried now... the damn thing practicaly glows! :lol:
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by pinkfloydpuffer » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:20 pm

define999 wrote:
Myaj wrote:LOL yes the green patch on the head is pretty much normal on a happy, healthy GSP.
Thanks Myaj! Im much less worried now... the damn thing practicaly glows! :lol:
Hehehe, my GSPs are like that too :D
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Jase » Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:59 pm

I sent Craig Watson an e-mail about it with a couple of your questions and directed him towards TPF. I know the chances of him joining up and discussing it are slim, but I figured it wouldn't hurt. :)
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by zombiefetus » Thu Feb 19, 2009 1:33 pm

Corvus wrote: The idea of hermaphrodites came, because males and females of T. nigroviridis apparently cannot be told apart by their DNA (have discussed that in another post). Hermaphrodism would be one explanation for this matter.
Where is this post? I just tried finding it and I couldn't seem to locate it, would love to read it.
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Corvus » Thu Feb 19, 2009 1:57 pm

I believe it was here... viewtopic.php?f=40&t=4757&p=135985

The scientific article of no sexing by DNA possible is: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 1&SRETRY=0
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by zombiefetus » Thu Feb 19, 2009 2:43 pm

Thanks :)
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Jase » Sun Feb 22, 2009 6:52 pm

Craig Watson, Director of the Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory, wrote me back with answers to a few of our questions:
We have a paper in review with Marine Genomics outlining reproduction, but here are the highlights:

They are marine spawners (we are using 33ppt). The eggs are 0.5 mm in diameter, pale yellow, and become adhesive within minutes after hitting the water. At 78 degrees F, they hatch in about 72 hours. The fry do not eat for the first three days, and on day 4 start eating rotifers. On day 4 we started feeding artemia. After a few weeks we ween them onto flake food.

They are very fecund, having 20% of their body weight in eggs. A 10 gram female will produce over 7,000 eggs.

The females are fairly obvious when gravid as they are much fatter than the males, but we have gotten sperm out of what we thought were "females" (they were fat males). I recommend taking them off feed for a few days before trying to sex them as food in their bellies can be easily confused with eggs.

We attempted natural spawning for over a year, and then standard induced spawning techniques using injections, all to no avail. We developed a new technique (which we will also be publishing) we are calling "ovarian lavage" whereby we flood the ovaries with HCG, a spawning aid, and the females are ovulating ~36 hours later. We are then expressing the eggs and sperm into a bowl, adding seawater to trigger the sperm, and then broadcasting the eggs into aquaria.

We just spawned several of our first generation fish that were 11 months old.

The methods are not suitable for the average hobbyist, but we are working with several experienced producers here in Florida to have them available in commercial quantities in the near future. If anyone succeeds in a natural spawn, I would be interested in hearing about it. I chased freshwater spawning based on some early posts on your forum and some anecdotal info from Maylaysia, but assure you they are marine spawners, as the sperm is esentially nonmotile in fresh, and very active at 33ppt.

Hope this helps.

Craig Watson, Director
Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory
University of Florida
I'm pretty impressed that the tried some ideas from the forum first :D
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Myaj » Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:20 pm

EXCELLENTTTTT!!!!!
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by pinkfloydpuffer » Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:25 pm

That is so cool!!!
Maybe now I can convince some people who don't believe me when I say that GSPs can live in full SW *smack*
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Nick » Sun Feb 22, 2009 10:00 pm

Marine spawners, VERY interesting. Also explains why young GSP seem to do well in full marine, and why adults do just as well in marine as brackish to some extent.
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Re: Large GSP commercial breeding! Must read!

Post by Myaj » Sun Feb 22, 2009 10:27 pm

Man, I wonder if RTR is around somewhere seeing this.. he would be thrilled that someone's finally found out a way to do it successfully. I understand the average aquariust wouldn't be able to do what they do with the hormones/lavage, but at least now we know where to start.

How amazing that the sperm is only viable in saltwater. After all these years of people trying to figure it out...
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